Naming and numbering streets and properties is important because it allows:

  • post to be delivered efficiently
  • emergency services to find a property quickly
  • visitors to find where they want to go
  • reliable delivery of products and services
  • service providers' records to be kept efficiently

Technology supports this in two ways:

  • councils maintain a local land and property gazetteer (LLPG), with data pooled to form a national address database
  • each address contains Ordnance Survey grid references, which make it possible to locate it on a map. This helps emergency services and service providers. It also makes a whole range of locational services available through mobile phones and in-car navigation systems possible

We're legally responsible for making sure that streets are named and properties numbered, so we have the power approve or reject property and street addresses.

Numbering of buildings

A new street is usually numbered with even numbers on the right and odd numbers on the left, except for a cul-de-sac where numbering is usually consecutive and clockwise. All numbers, including 13, must be used in the proper sequence. Application to omit any number from a sequence will be refused. Building names or numbers will be allocated to the road serving the main entrance.

For small blocks of flats, the block will be numbered in the street (and possibly named as well). Individual flats within the block will include a suffix A, B, C, D etc.

Naming of buildings

On unnumbered streets it's essential that houses have officially allocated names. The name shouldn't repeat the name of the road or that of any house or building in the area.

New development

New street names should follow this protocol:

  • Avenue, Drive, Place or Gardens. These titles are acceptable for any type of new street in the area
  • Street or Road - for any thoroughfare
  • Way - for a major road
  • Crescent - for a crescent-shaped road only
  • Close - for a cul-de-sac only
  • Square - for a square only
  • Hill - for a hill only
  • Circus - for a roundabout only
  • Terrace - for a terrace of houses but not as a subsidiary name within another road
  • Mews - this is currently popular and is considered acceptable in appropriate circumstances
  • End - for a road with only one entrance/exit
  • Lane - for development of an historic by way

All new pedestrian ways should end with Walk, Path or Alley.

  • All named blocks should end with one of the following:
  • Court - for flats and other residential buildings
  • Mansions - other residential buildings
  • House - residential blocks only

Postcodes

Royal Mail is responsible for allocating postcodes to addresses. But it won't issue postcodes without first receiving notification from us that addresses have been allocated to the properties concerned. Royal Mail can deal with postcode queries.

It is possible to change an address but you have to apply in writing to get it legally recognised. You can also add a name to an already-numbered property.

Fees

Valid from 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018

Naming of a new dwelling £82.80
New development of up to 10 dwellings including a new street name £212.80
New development of over 10 dwellings including a new street name £212.80 plus £35.50 per property over 10
Re-naming of a property £35.50 per property
Confirmation of address £35.50 per property
Change of business name or alias name no charge

Apply

You can apply for a change of address or new address by filling in this application form and emailing it to building.control@harrogate.gov.uk

Application form

Contact us

If you'd like to discuss your proposals before making your application, or for any naming or numbering queries, contact the street naming and numbering officer on 01423 500600 or email building.control@harrogate.gov.uk

For more general address queries, contact the gazetteer custodian on 01423 500600 x56167.

Page last updated 06/12/2017